Tender Buttons A Box Analysis Essay

Abstract:

The modernist poem, despite—or perhaps because of—its celebrated fragments, ruins, and other surface discontinuities, has both figured itself and been figured as a continuous, hard, transparent texture, one that suppresses the role of touch at work in its making and reception, favoring instead a mode of engagement modeled on visual perception. Gertrude Stein's Tender Buttons provides a radical alternative to such hard, masculinized modernist surfaces and our habits of engaging them by accentuating, rather than effacing, the perception of texture. Against the longstanding tendency among Stein's readers to privilege sight's role in Tender Buttons and her aesthetics more broadly, this essay attends to touch and texture in Stein's text. Stein's foregrounding of touch as mode of inquiry reorients our encounters with the modernist object, fostering queer (strange, improper, undecided) moments of tactile and affective feeling that attach to and exceed everyday objects, including poetic objects like Tender Buttons.



"Tender Buttons" By Gertrude Stein A Fragment Analysis

NOTHING ELEGANT"A charm a single charm is doubtful. If the red is rose and there is a gate surrounding it, if inside is let in and there places change then certainly something is upright. It is earnest." (G.S., TB., pg3)Gertrude Stein is best known for her experimental modernist unique style. The uniqueness lies in the fact that contrary to men writers then, she sought to find beauty and the power of the word in simple sentences, using extended metaphors formed of every day common words.

In Tender Buttons, Stein focuses on her experimental style , trying new ways of eliminating grammar and syntax and using words without their meaning, in a circular , encrypted poetry. She explores Objects, Food and Rooms; in short, her every day life and love that she shared with her companion.

Stein says she writes for herself and for strangers, that is she writes for anyone who wants to listen but she will not be influenced by critics. Her work meets both modernist and postmodernist traits.

Her main concern was to describe how we see things. The cubism theory which highly influenced her, stated that people cannot say what they see.. they just say what they were taught to say. That is why painters like Picasso wanted to reproduce a face or a thing from each and every angle one might see it, for a better accuracy , using geometrical shapes. Also Picasso stated that the more the audience was shocked meant that the more people were losing their original perceiving power.

By using imagist means, Gertrude Stein creates the same thing. She...

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